×

10% discount on your next order!

Subscribe to our newsletter and receive a personal discount code for 10% discount on a album of your choice! After subscribing, you will receive the code in your email. This code is only valid for 10 days!




The code is valid one time and valid for a 10 days after receiving the promotioncode. Your emailaddress will only be used by Challenge Records International and will not be given to 3rd party advertisers. If you have any questions please contact us.

Review of the day by Scott Yanow: Various Artists - Unissued on 78 Hot Jazz 1926-1932

21-08-2013 Review of the day by Scott Yanow: Various Artists - Unissued on 78 Hot Jazz 1926-1932

Unissued on 78s has 24 numbers (mostly alternate takes) from 1926-32 that 1920s collectors will want.
          
The 24 selections on this CD date from 1926-32 and are programmed in chronological order. None of these performances, which are mostly alternate takes, ever came out on 78. The majority made their debut appearance on Lp and many have been out-of-print for years. One, the humorous gaspipe clarinetist Wilton Crawley’s “Put A Flavour To Love,” has never been out before and includes some fine playing by guitarist Eddie Lang.
           
Included on this set of mostly hot jazz are performances by Thomas Morris’ Seven Hot Babies, Bennie Moten’s Kansas City Orchestra (including the intriguing “Oh! Eddie” which hints strongly in spots at “Moten Swing” which had not been composed yet), the Earl Hines Big Band, Joe Steele (an obscure but worthy group), Jelly Roll Morton’s Red Hot Peppers (four often-riotous alternate performances), Fess Williams’ Royal Flush Orchestra, McKinney’s Cotton Pickers, Duke Ellington (the obscure “I’m So In Love With You”), the Washboard Rhythm Kings, Baron Lee’s Blue Rhythm Band and the unknown Leon Rene Orchestra.
           
While there are occasional mistakes (which is why some of these numbers became alternate takes), all of the performances have their hot moments. This is the second release in Retrieval’s “Unissued On 78s” series and both are highly recommended to 1920s collectors.
 
Scott Yanow

Add a comment


We need to make sure that you are really an human, please enter the code below.

code