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Matthäus Passion (limited edition)
Johann Sebastian Bach

Ton Koopman / The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra & Choir

Matthäus Passion (limited edition)

Format: CD
Label: Challenge Classics
UPC: 0608917223224
Catnr: CC 72232
Release date: 01 March 2019
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2 CD
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Label
Challenge Classics
UPC
0608917223224
Catalogue number
CC 72232
Release date
01 March 2019

""Conductor has unknown Cantata by Händel in possession.""

De Volkskrant, 08-4-2016
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About the album

Bach’s St. Matthew Passion

When in 1723 Johann Sebastian Bach entered upon the office of Thomascantor in the city of Leipzig, he continued one of the most recent and most important innovations introduced by his predecessor, Johann Kuhnau. On Good Friday of the year 1721 Kuhnau presented for the first time a Passion in concerted style at the afternoon vesper service of St. Thomas Church. Protestant churches in other cities, and especially court churches, had by 1700 introduced the modern Passion type that included contemplative poetry, incorporated arias and recitatives, and featured rich instrumental accompaniment. Leipzig’s New Church, since Georg Philipp Telemann’s years there a hotbed of innovation in matters of sacred music, saw the first performance of a Passion oratorio already in 1717, so that Kuhnau felt very much under pressure to compete. But the Leipzig church administration resisted until 1721.

Although granting no changes for the Good Friday morning service, they finally instituted a special afternoon service in order to accommodate a “musicirte Passion” in place of the traditional practice, under which the congregation sang long and unaccompanied Passion chorales like the 23-stanza hymn “O Mensch bewein dein Sünde groß” of 1525. The composition presented by Kuhnau, a St. Mark Passion, survives in only incomplete form. But even from the fragment we can see that he established a model which remained valid for Bach insofar as it focused on the unaltered biblical narrative distributed among soloists (evangelist and various soliloquentes: Jesus, Peter, Pilate, etc.) and choir (various turbae: High Priests, Roman Soldiers, Jews, etc.), a sequence interrupted here and there by hymn strophes and contemplative lyrics set to freely composed verse, mainly in the form of arias. The whole structure was divided into two parts, one before and one after the hour-long vesper sermon.

Under Bach the Passion performances became the musical highpoint of the church year in Leipzig. The first summary worklist of 1750, the year of Bach’s death, reported that he had actually composed five Passions. They were apparently performed in alternating fashion, but only two such works are still extant, the Passions according to St. John (first performed in 1724) and St. Matthew (premiered in 1727). A Passion according to St. Mark of 1731 survived in its text only (the music is lost), and of the other two Passions there remains no trace. The St. Matthew Passion—in the early worklist specifically designated “for double chorus” and in the Bach family circle referred to as the “Great Passion” (Große Passion)—clearly represents Bach’s most significant contribution to this genre of church music. The St. John Passion on the other hand was never put in final form; Bach continued to experiment with different versions until 1749. The principal reason for this situation seems to be a lack of textual unity because the madrigal lyrics in the St. John Passion were compiled from various poetic sources, and the remarkable adaptability of the work in its various versions cannot entirely conceal this inherent aesthetic problem. The St. Matthew Passion, however, was based on a unified libretto by Christian Friedrich Henrici, better known by his pen-name Picander.

Whether Bach commissioned Henrici or Henrici approached Bach, a close collaboration of the two is beyond doubt, both on the conceptual level and in matters of detail. The famous 1711 Passion libretto by Barthold Heinrich Brockes which Bach had utilized for his St. John Passion loomed rather large as a model. Picander emulated Brockes’ allegorical dialogue between “The Daughters of Zion” (Die Tochter Zion) and “The Faithful” (Die Gläubigen). Moreover, the poetic language of Bach’s Weimar librettist Salomon Franck proved inspiring as well. However, it became of utmost importance for the gospel text to be preserved intact and for the lyrics to reflect the appropriate theological scope. Here Bach may have alerted Henrici to pertinent sources such as the Passion homilies of Heinrich Müller, a seventeenth-century Lutheran theologian whose books could be found in his library.

Some structural features seem to have been specifically requested by the composer. For example, the allegorical dialogue is arranged so that The Daughters of Zion and The Faithful do not just appear successively but simultaneously, as in aria no. 20 where the soloist of choir I sings “Ich will bei meinem Jesu wachen” (I will wake with my Jesus) while choir II responds ”So schlafen unsre Sünden ein” (Thus will our sins go to sleep) – this kind of conjunction being essential for the double choir design. Likewise, the combination of free lyrics with traditional hymns (most prominently featured in the opening chorus) may have been suggested by Bach because it reflected his keen interest in multi-layered polyphonic structures involving a chorale melody.

What emerged was a libretto that used the same textual components as the St. John but avoided the pitfalls of heterogeneous lyrics. With its more extensive and complex madrigal-style poetry, Picander’s St. Matthew Passion libretto indeed constituted, from a literary point of view, a unified Passion oratorio. Consequently, the St. Matthew Passion libretto enabled Bach to conceive a wholly original work and to compose it in a single sweep. There was neither room nor need for the kind of radical alterations that the St. John Passion underwent, even though Bach nearly always found occasion to change and improve. In the case of the St. Matthew Passion, a significant revision occurred only once after its first performance at St. Thomas’s on April 11, 1727. It happened for the definite purpose of enhancing the work’s monumental character by extending its musical dimensions and by expanding and refocusing its performing forces, while leaving the overall design and libretto intact.

In 1736, when the work was performed for the third time, Bach replaced the simple chorale “Jesum lass ich nicht von mir,” which originally concluded part I, with the large-scale chorale setting “O Mensch, bewein dein Sünde groß” appropriated from the second version of the St. John Passion. Additionally, he created a more decisive division of the entire ensemble into two fully separate vocal-instrumental bodies by assigning separate continuo groups to choirs I and II, instead of letting one common continuo group provide the fundament for both choirs. Finally, in addition to the regular location on the west gallery of the church for placing the two choirs and two orchestras, Bach used the so-called swallow’s nest organ and choir loft at the east end of the nave. From this space sounded the chorale melodies of the two movements framing part I of the Passion (nos. 1 and 29), performed by a third choir of soprano singers accompanied by the small organ, a decision that mobilized all available musical resources at St. Thomas’s and surely resulted in a spectacular effect.

The definitive character of Bach’s 1736 revision of the St. Matthew Passion and concomitant performance decisions is expressed by the calligraphic autograph fair copy that he set out to prepare that year and that he later on completed with greatest scrupulousness. There is no comparable manuscript score from Bach’s hand that is so carefully laid out and written in two colors of ink, red and dark brown. Red is applied to the biblical text of the evangelist and the soliloquentes, the chorale melody “O Lamm Gottes unschuldig” in the first movement, and a few rubrics. It could not be more evident that in 1736 Bach considered this score as most significant work, the Great Passion. In fact, he treasured the manuscript score so much that even when the opening pages were damaged by some mishap in later years, he carefully restored them by pasting on strips of paper and replacing lost staves. But while Bach could hardly imagine that the Great Passion, more than any of his other works, would make history in the truest sense of the word, he knew full well from the earliest planning stages that this composition would be special–indeed, that nothing like it had ever been attempted before.

In many ways, the time, space, focus, and meaning of the musical vespers service on Good Friday gave Bach a unique opportunity to set his imagination free, and he grasped the opportunity from the very beginning by composing the Passion according to St. John. Yet one discerns everywhere in the St. Matthew Passion his intention, already clear from the work’s internal and external dimensions, of surpassing everything that had been written previously, by himself and by other composers. The score containing 68 movements, some of extraordinary length, required an eight-voice double choir and a richly equipped double orchestra. He could bring to the big project the rich experience he had gained through his sustained involvement with the church cantata over a period of four years. However, his ambitions went far beyond the monumental format that he so consciously chose. We can best understand his approach as an artist to the musical shaping of the Passion story by seeing how he planned and ordered it so as to bring out a wealth of interconnections. We also see how he employed musical forms and compositional techniques in an exceedingly imaginative and totally non-schematic manner in order to serve the most sacred biblical text of the Lutheran faith on the highest feast day of the church.

The primary structural backbone of the St. John Passion and, therefore, the compositional focus of that work, rests on the Gospel narrative. In the St. Matthew Passion, by contrast, it is Picander’s poetry, lyrical contemplations of individual scenes in the story of the Passion, that shapes the work. None of the original text booklets from Bach’s performances have survived, but the first reprint of the text in the second volume of Picander’s collected works, Ernst-Schertzhaffte und Satyrische Gedichte, published in 1729, shows how the biblical Passion narrative is framed and punctuated by seventeen poems, most of them bipartite. Hence the biblical material is divided, in accordance with the poet’s conception and its realization by the composer, into fifteen scenes and two introductions, to which both the lyrical meditations and the pointed interspersing of hymn stanzas relate. All of the lyrics are introduced by precise biblical references– for example nos. 5-6, “When the woman anointed Jesus” (Als das Weib Jesum gesalbet hatte)–so that the specific reflective and interpretive function of every single poem and musical setting becomes immediately clear.

It is a distinguishing mark of the St. Matthew Passion that Bach chose to draw deliberately on the wide repertory of forms cultivated in the sacred and secular music of his day. Even Baroque opera, the most representative genre of the age, could not compare in its range of compositional types and forms, for opera naturally finds no place for movements based on a cantus firmus, which belong exclusively to the domain of sacred music, or for settings in the style of a polyphonic motet (of which there are several examples among the turba choruses of the Passion). Anyway, such a degree of polyphonic elaboration, which is typical of the church style in general and Bach’s artistic preferences in particular, would be worlds away from operatic practice. But well beyond questions of form, genre, and compositional technique, the St. Matthew Passion challenged the full scope of Bach’s musical art, from analyzing the literary material, the symbolic and affective imagery, and the theological content to considering the appropriate representation of the Passion story. He did so by making optimal use of all fitting musical means, from the widely diverging qualities of human singing voices and instrumental sonorities (exclusive of brass) to the broad spectrum of melodic inventions, rhythmic patterns, harmonic structures, and key choices.

With respect to the latter two, the composer of the Well-Tempered Clavier not only had the advantage of his cutting-edge experimental background, he also sought to extend his experience to the realm of vocal-instrumental music. In its range of keys and daring harmonic treatment, the St. Matthew Passion indeed exceeds all largescale works in any genre by any composer up to that point, even though these path-breaking aspects would not be fully recognized until the nineteenth century. By meandering through the keys while drawing on an extraordinary array of colors in the instrumental obbligato accompaniments of the various arias, Bach explores the widest possible range of musical expression. The settings of the Picander poems function as pillars of stability, from the dual tonality and modality in the opening chorus through the full chromatic realm of keys up to four sharps and flats–the maximum range for a mixed group of instruments not regulated by equal temperament.

Given those limitations, Bach did not shy away from breaking out of these restrictions when underscoring extreme affects or imagery. For example, in the harmonically unique arioso no. 59 (“Ach Golgatha”) he fully exploits all twelve chromatic pitches, moves through chords as remote and exorbitant as A-flat minor and F-flat minor (requiring double flats), and lets the alto voice end the piece with an unresolved tritone, D-flat to G. Likewise, in the death scene no. 61a, after using the pitch of f-flat for the word “Finsternis” (darkness), he puts Jesus’s last words, the Hebrew “Eli, Eli, lama asabthani,” in B-flat minor (5 flats) near the bottom end of the circle of fifths, and to complete the descent to the absolute depth of despair, he sets the subsequent translation one step beyond that, in E-flat minor (6 flats). In a kind of counterpoint to this extreme venture at the brink of the key system–at once compellingly expressive and symbolic–and on a greatly spaced-out scale, Bach pursues a corresponding yet reverse tonal descent in his key choices for the principal “Passion chorale”–the melody of “Herzlich tut mich verlangen” in nos.15, 17, 44, 54, and 62–whose successive key signatures (#### - bbb - ## - b – 0) demarcate the path of inevitability no less forcefully. As for sophisticated and decisively innovative compositional planning, one cannot but notice how much further Bach goes here than he does in the St. John Passion. The two principal and fundamentally different textual layers that constitute the libretto of the St. Matthew Passion– madrigal poetry on the one hand, holy scripture and chorales on the other–are nowhere abruptly juxtaposed. On the contrary, Henrici and Bach alike set a premium on seamless integration that is already manifest in the opening chorus, in which freely conceived verse and chorale text and melody perfectly blend into each other, the cantus firmus “O Lamm Gottes unschuldig” (O innocent lamb of God) immediately responds to the dialogue “Seht ihn! Wie? Als wie ein Lamm!” (See him! How? Just as a lamb!). In this sense, the opening chorus provides a summation of what the entire Passion oratorio aims to achieve in theological content, literary structure, and musical expression. Picander’s allegorical lament “Kommt, ihr Töchter” is set by Bach in the manner of a French tombeau, as a funeral march for the multitude of believers who ascend to Mount Zion and the holy city of Jerusalem. The Daughters of Zion, personification of the site of Christ’s suffering, call on The Faithful, representing the contemporary believer, to join her. In the Apocalypse of St. John, the site of Christ’s Passion is an integral part of the vision of the eternal Jerusalem whose ruler is the Lamb. Here one finds the reason for the deliberate connection between the aria text “Kommt, ihr Töchter, helft mir klagen” (Come, you daughters, help me lament), set by Bach in E minor, and the chorale “O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig” set in G major: “celestial” major proclaiming Christ’s innocence and “terrestrial” minor accentuating Christ’s suffering are contrasted, yet integrated in one and the same musical setting.

This theologically meaningful poetic and musical dia - lectic is placed by Picander and Bach as a kind of vision that precedes the account of the Passion and provides an ultimate goal for the gradual unfolding of the drama. Throughout the musical score, the tension between major and minor modes is never resolved, quite the reverse, it becomes increasingly acute in the course of the Passion story in the constant oscillation between sharp and flat keys before finally subsiding in the final chorus in C minor. The beginning of the work thus determines its ending: the dual tonality and modality of the opening chorus, E minor and G major, exposes the dramatic tension that the final chorus can only partly resolve. Therefore, the true resolution comes only when the radiant major mode, enhanced by the triadic fanfares of the trumpets, resonates two days later in the cantata on Easter Sunday.

Through its reference to the innocent Lamb as the ruler in Zion, the celestial Jerusalem, the opening cho - rus provides the Passion with a mighty visionary or, theologically speaking, eschatological preface. Thus, when the G-major chorale sung from the swallows’ nest organ loft at St. Thomas’s above the so-called Triumphal Arch–that is, from the altar side–pierced the E minor and thereby forced a modal switch, the music revealed its deep symbolic dimension right from the outset. For the tremendous show of musical force (two choirs and two orchestras on the main west gallery, a distant third choir on the small east gallery) was not meant as a mere display of powerful and luxuriant sound. The chorale reverberating from the chancel side of the church warned the audience and alerted skeptics at the outset that what awaited them was not a theatrical feature, but music that provided incontestable proof of its sacred and genuinely liturgical character.

Christoph Wolf
De tweede opname van de Matthäus-Passion door Ton Koopman
Dit album bevat de tweede opname van de Matthäus-Passion van Johann Sebastian Bach door Ton Koopman, zijn Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra and Choir, en het jongenskoor van de Sacramentskerk in Breda. De uitvoering is live opgenomen in de St. Joriskerk in Amersfoort.

In 1992 nam Ton Koopman voor het eerst de Matthäus-Passion op voor het label Erato. Meer dan tien jaar later besloot hij het werk opnieuw op te nemen. In deze tweede opname van de Matthäus-Passion zit de ervaring verwerkt die Koopman opdeed tijdens het opnemen van alle Bachcantates. Het resultaat kan niet minder overtuigend zijn in beeld en geluid, wat niet in de laatste plaats te danken is aan de voortreffelijke solisten.

Toen Bach in 1723 de positie van Thomascantor in Leipzig aannam, zette hij een van de meest recente en belangrijke vernieuwingen van zijn voorganger Johann Kuhnau voort: het uitvoeren van een moderne passie met aria’s, recitatieven en instrumentale begeleiding. De uitvoeringen van de passies van Bach vormden de hoogtepunten van het kerkelijke jaar in Leipzig. Volgens de catalogus van werken uit 1750 heeft Bach vijf passies gecomponeerd, die beurtelings werden opgevoerd. Er zijn slechts twee passies compleet overgeleverd: de Matthäus-Passion en de Johannes-Passion. De Matthäus-Passion kan ongetwijfeld nog steeds het publiek overweldigen.
Neuauflage der Matthäus Passion in limitierter Sonderedition:
Passionsspiele wurden unter Bach zu den musikalischen Höhepunkten des Kirchenjahres in Leipzig. Dass die Matthäuspassion auch heute noch das Publikum überwältigen kann, steht außer Frage.
Ton Koopman entschied sich - nach der ersten Aufnahme bei ERATO vor mehr als 10 Jahren -, dieses Meisterwerk noch einmal aufzunehmen und damit seine Erfahrung der intensiven Auseinandersetzung mit dem gesamten Kantatenwerk Bachs einzubringen. Das Ergebnis könnte in Bild und Ton nicht überzeugender sein, nicht zuletzt dank der hervorragenden Solisten, die viel ausgewogener sind als beim ersten Mal:
Jörg Dürmüller (Evangelist), Ekkehard Abele (Christus), Cornelia Samuelis (Sopran), Bogna Bartosz (Alt), Paul Agnew (Tenor), Klaus Mertens (Bass)

Artist(s)

Paul Agnew

The Scottish tenor, Paul Agnew, read music as a Choral Scholar at Magdalen College, Oxford. After earning his degree, he became associated with the Consort of Musicke, and remained a member of this wonderful early music ensemble for many productive years. At these early stages of his career, he has also made numerous appearances with The Tallis Scholars (Director: Peter Phillips), The Sixteen (Director: Harry Christophers) and the Gothic Voices, before finally striking out on his own as a soloist in the early 1990's.
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The Scottish tenor, Paul Agnew, read music as a Choral Scholar at Magdalen College, Oxford. After earning his degree, he became associated with the Consort of Musicke, and remained a member of this wonderful early music ensemble for many productive years. At these early stages of his career, he has also made numerous appearances with The Tallis Scholars (Director: Peter Phillips), The Sixteen (Director: Harry Christophers) and the Gothic Voices, before finally striking out on his own as a soloist in the early 1990's.

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Jörg Dürmüller

The Swiss lyric tenor, Jörg Dürmüller, studied violin and voice at the Winterthur Conservatoire in Switzerland with Ruth Binder (1977-1982), and with a scholarship of the Migros-Genossenschafts-Bund at the Academy of Music and Theatre in Hamburg with Naan Pöld, Hans Kagel and Hertha Werner (1982-1987). He attended master-classes given by Edith Mathis, Christa Ludwig and Hermann Prey. Jörg Dürmüller's first opera-engagement led him in 1987 to the Bielefeld City Theatre, where he was a member of the ensemble for five years. From 1995 to 1997 he was engaged as the first tenor at the Brunswick State Theatre under Kammersängerin Brigitte Fassbaender. He appeared also at the State Opera of Hamburg, and at the Theatre in Revier Gelsenkirchen. In 1996 he appeared as a guest at the Comic Opera Berlin...
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The Swiss lyric tenor, Jörg Dürmüller, studied violin and voice at the Winterthur Conservatoire in Switzerland with Ruth Binder (1977-1982), and with a scholarship of the Migros-Genossenschafts-Bund at the Academy of Music and Theatre in Hamburg with Naan Pöld, Hans Kagel and Hertha Werner (1982-1987). He attended master-classes given by Edith Mathis, Christa Ludwig and Hermann Prey.
Jörg Dürmüller's first opera-engagement led him in 1987 to the Bielefeld City Theatre, where he was a member of the ensemble for five years. From 1995 to 1997 he was engaged as the first tenor at the Brunswick State Theatre under Kammersängerin Brigitte Fassbaender. He appeared also at the State Opera of Hamburg, and at the Theatre in Revier Gelsenkirchen. In 1996 he appeared as a guest at the Comic Opera Berlin in the role of Fernando in Così fan tutte produced by Harry Kupfer, and at the National Theatre of Braunschweig as Andres in Wozzeck by Alban Berg. In 2002 and 2003 he sang the role of Bajazete in George Frideric Handel’s Tamerlano also at the Opera Comique Berlin directed by David Alden.

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Ekkehard Abele

The German bass-baritone, Ekkehard Abele, studied church music (organ) and singing at the music schools of Freiburg and Saarbrücken, and last with Kurt Widmer in Basel, where he finished his with the soloist diploma. He had further studies with Eugène Rabine in Weimar, with whom he is still connected in a regular co-operation. In 1996 He received the Bach award at the International J.S. Bach Competition in Leipzig. Apart from the usual concert repertoire, Ekkehard Abele dedicates himself to solo and ensemble singing (he was a member of the Neue Vocalsolisten Stuttgart for many years) of both Early music and contemporary music. He devotes much of his time to the performance of modern and contemporary music, and has appeared in concerts of works by Nono,...
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The German bass-baritone, Ekkehard Abele, studied church music (organ) and singing at the music schools of Freiburg and Saarbrücken, and last with Kurt Widmer in Basel, where he finished his with the soloist diploma. He had further studies with Eugène Rabine in Weimar, with whom he is still connected in a regular co-operation. In 1996 He received the Bach award at the International J.S. Bach Competition in Leipzig.
Apart from the usual concert repertoire, Ekkehard Abele dedicates himself to solo and ensemble singing (he was a member of the Neue Vocalsolisten Stuttgart for many years) of both Early music and contemporary music. He devotes much of his time to the performance of modern and contemporary music, and has appeared in concerts of works by Nono, Stockhausen, Rihm and Mauricio Kagel. He performed Ligeti's Aventures et Nouvelles Aventures at the Staatstheater Saarbrücken. A regular co-operation connects him with conductors such as Thomas Hengelbrock and Hermann Max and ensemble like the Young Opera Company Freiburg or the Freiburger Barockorchester, Ensemble Movimento, Orlando-di-Lasso-Ensemble, Himmlischen Cantorey and Deutschen Kammerchor. With them he appeared in opera productions at the Wiener Festwochen and at the Münchner Opernfestspielen, as well as at Festivals in Utrecht, Luzern, Dresden, Ansbach and Leipzig. In June 2004 he participated in a performance of J.S. Bach’s Matthäus-Passion (BWV 244) conducted by Hermann Max at the Israel Festival Jerusalem.

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Cornelia Samuelis

Cornelia Samuelis (born 1972) is a German classical soprano who has performed in opera, oratorio, lieder and chamber music both in her native Germany and internationally. Her many recordings as a soprano soloist include Bach's St Matthew Passion conducted by Ton Koopman and the sacred works of Alessandro Melani conducted by Hermann Max. Samuelis was born in Gernsbach and completed her studies in singing and violin at the Musikhochschule in Detmold in 1996.
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Cornelia Samuelis (born 1972) is a German classical soprano who has performed in opera, oratorio, lieder and chamber music both in her native Germany and internationally. Her many recordings as a soprano soloist include Bach's St Matthew Passion conducted by Ton Koopman and the sacred works of Alessandro Melani conducted by Hermann Max.

Samuelis was born in Gernsbach and completed her studies in singing and violin at the Musikhochschule in Detmold in 1996.


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Bogna Bartosz

The Polish mezzo-soprano and contralto, Bogna Bartosz, after leaving school, first studied singing at the Academy of Music in Gdansk (and/or Danzig Music Academy). After graduating with distinction, she continued her studies at the Hochschule der Künste Berlin (Berlin Academy of Arts) under Professor Ingrid Figur, and took part in master-classes with Aribert Reimann, Adele Stolte and Anna Reynolds. At the 9th International J.S. Bach Competition in Leipzig in 1992, Bogna Bartosz won first prize, as well as the special prize awarded by the MDR broadcasting organization in Leipzig. Since then Bogna Bartosz has sung with well-known orchestras (including Berliner Barock Orchester, Akademie für Alte Musik Berlin, Musica Antiqua Köln, Kammersolisten der Deutschen Oper Berlin, Radio-Symphonie-Orchester-Berlin, Gewandhaus- orchester Leipzig, MDR Sinfonieorchester Leipzig, Dresdner Philharmoniker and Württembergisches Kammerorchester, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra, Israel Chamber Orchestra Tel Aviv, Japan Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra, Minnesota Orchestra)...
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The Polish mezzo-soprano and contralto, Bogna Bartosz, after leaving school, first studied singing at the Academy of Music in Gdansk (and/or Danzig Music Academy). After graduating with distinction, she continued her studies at the Hochschule der Künste Berlin (Berlin Academy of Arts) under Professor Ingrid Figur, and took part in master-classes with Aribert Reimann, Adele Stolte and Anna Reynolds. At the 9th International J.S. Bach Competition in Leipzig in 1992, Bogna Bartosz won first prize, as well as the special prize awarded by the MDR broadcasting organization in Leipzig.
Since then Bogna Bartosz has sung with well-known orchestras (including Berliner Barock Orchester, Akademie für Alte Musik Berlin, Musica Antiqua Köln, Kammersolisten der Deutschen Oper Berlin, Radio-Symphonie-Orchester-Berlin, Gewandhaus- orchester Leipzig, MDR Sinfonieorchester Leipzig, Dresdner Philharmoniker and Württembergisches Kammerorchester, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra, Israel Chamber Orchestra Tel Aviv, Japan Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra, Minnesota Orchestra) and leading conductors (including Horia Andrescu, Moche Atzmon, Marcus Creed, Philippe Entremont, Jörg Faerber, Enoch zu Guttenberg, Philippe Herreweghe, Marek Janowski, Ton Koopman, Krzysztof Penderecki, Helmuth Rilling, Jeffrey Tate, Marcello Viotti, Lothar Zagrosek, Udo Zimmermann), in all the major concert halls in Germany (such as Berliner Philharmonie, Berliner Konzerthaus, Leipziger Gewandhaus, Alte Oper Frankfurt, Kölner Philharmonie, Tonhalle Düsseldorf, Glocke Bremen, Hamburger Musikhalle, Liederhalle Stuttgart), as well as in Europe, the USA and Israel, and at numerous major festivals.

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Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra & Choir

Ton Koopman founded the Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra in 1979. The group consists of internationally renowned baroque specialists who meet up several times a year and work together to prepare and perform new exciting programmes. For the musicians each concert is a new experience and Koopman's boundless energy and enthusiasm are a sure guarantee of the highest quality. The Amsterdam Baroque Choir was founded in 1992 and it made its debut during the Holland Festival of Early Music in Utrecht performing the world première of the Requiem (for 15 voices) and Vespers (for 32 voices) by H.I.F. Biber. The recording of both of these works won the Cannes Classical Award for the best performance of 17th/18th century choral music. For its rare...
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Ton Koopman founded the Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra in 1979. The group consists of internationally renowned baroque specialists who meet up several times a year and work together to prepare and perform new exciting programmes. For the musicians each concert is a new experience and Koopman's boundless energy and enthusiasm are a sure guarantee of the highest quality.
The Amsterdam Baroque Choir was founded in 1992 and it made its debut during the Holland Festival of Early Music in Utrecht performing the world première of the Requiem (for 15 voices) and Vespers (for 32 voices) by H.I.F. Biber. The recording of both of these works won the Cannes Classical Award for the best performance of 17th/18th century choral music. For its rare combination of textural clarity and interpretative flexibility, the Amsterdam Baroque Choir is considered among today’s most outstanding choirs. In 1994 Ton Koopman and the Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra & Choir embarked upon the most ambitious recording project of the last decades: the integral recording of Bach’s secular and sacred cantatas. For this extraordinary project Koopman and his ensemble received the Deutsche Schallplatten-Preis Echo Klassik. Next to the CD recordings three books have been edited and published by Ton Koopman and the musicologist Christoph Wolff and a series of six documentaries was produced and broadcasted by various TV stations.
Alongside Bach’s music the Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra & Choir has recorded all major baroque and classical works. Major recognitions include the Gramophone Award, Diapason d'Or, 10-Repertoire, Stern des Monats-Fono Forum, the Prix Hector Berlioz and two Edison Awards. In 2008 the ensemble and Ton Koopman have been honoured with the prestigious BBC Award. Since March 2003 “Antoine Marchand”, a new sub-label of Challenge Classics, took over the release of Koopman’s new recordings and among many others has published 22 CD boxes of the Bach Cantatas, a new recording of the St. Matthew Passion (on CD and DVD) and St. Markus Passion of J.S. Bach (DVD), live recorded in Milan, as well as the first seven volumes of the Buxtehude Opera-Omnia Edition. Ton Koopman and the ABO & ABC are regular guests at the major concert halls of Europe, the USA and Japan. In the 2008/09 season they will tour extensively in Europe (Amsterdam, Paris, Madrid, Vienna, Milan, Cologne, Dresden, Düsseldorf etc) and in Far East with concerts in Hong Kong, Seoul and Tokyo.
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Ton Koopman (conductor)

Ton Koopman is a leading figure in Early Music and historically informed performance practice. As organist and harpsichordist Ton Koopman has performed all over the world and played the most beautiful historical instruments of Europe. His Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra & Choir has gained worldwide fame as one of the best ensembles on period instruments. Between 1994 and 2004 Ton Koopman and ABO&C have recorded all sacred and secular cantatas by Johann Sebastian Bach, an extraordinary project that earned international acclaim. After that Koopman recorded the complete works by Bach’s predecessor, Dieterich Buxtehude. Besides performing as a soloist and with his ABO&C, Ton Koopman is very active as a guest conductor for modern orchestras and also devotes part of his time...
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Ton Koopman is a leading figure in Early Music and historically informed performance practice. As organist and harpsichordist Ton Koopman has performed all over the world and played the most beautiful historical instruments of Europe. His Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra & Choir has gained worldwide fame as one of the best ensembles on period instruments. Between 1994 and 2004 Ton Koopman and ABO&C have recorded all sacred and secular cantatas by Johann Sebastian Bach, an extraordinary project that earned international acclaim. After that Koopman recorded the complete works by Bach’s predecessor, Dieterich Buxtehude. Besides performing as a soloist and with his ABO&C, Ton Koopman is very active as a guest conductor for modern orchestras and also devotes part of his time to teaching. Ton Koopman is president of the International Dieterich Buxtehude Society and, since 2019, president of the Leipzig Bach Archiv.

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Composer(s)

Johann Sebastian Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach was a German composer and musician of the Baroque period. He enriched established German styles through his skill in counterpoint, harmonic and motivic organisation, and the adaptation of rhythms, forms, and textures from abroad, particularly from Italy and France. Bach's compositions include the Brandenburg Concertos, the Goldberg Variations, the Mass in B minor, two Passions, and hundreds of cantatas. His music is revered for its technical command, artistic beauty, and intellectual depth.  Bach's abilities as an organist were highly respected during his lifetime, although he was not widely recognised as a great composer until a revival of interest in and performances of his music in the first half of the 19th century. He is now generally regarded as one of the greatest composers of all time.  
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Johann Sebastian Bach was a German composer and musician of the Baroque period. He enriched established German styles through his skill in counterpoint, harmonic and motivic organisation, and the adaptation of rhythms, forms, and textures from abroad, particularly from Italy and France. Bach's compositions include the Brandenburg Concertos, the Goldberg Variations, the Mass in B minor, two Passions, and hundreds of cantatas. His music is revered for its technical command, artistic beauty, and intellectual depth.

Bach's abilities as an organist were highly respected during his lifetime, although he was not widely recognised as a great composer until a revival of interest in and performances of his music in the first half of the 19th century. He is now generally regarded as one of the greatest composers of all time.


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Press

"Conductor has unknown Cantata by Händel in possession."
De Volkskrant, 08-4-2016

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Disc #1
01.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 1. Chori: Kommt, ihr Töchter, helft mir klagen
06:59
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Ton Koopman, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
02.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 3. Choral: Herzliebster Jesu, was dast du verbrochen
00:41
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Ton Koopman, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
03.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 4a. Recitativo (Evangelista): Da versammleten sich die Hohenpriester
00:22
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Jörg Dürmüller, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
04.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 4b. Chori: Ja nicht auf das Fest
00:12
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Ton Koopman, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
05.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 4c. Recitativo (Evangelista): Da nun Jesus war zu Bethanien
00:25
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Jörg Dürmüller, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
06.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 4d. Chorus I: Wozu dienet dieser Unrat?
00:24
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Ton Koopman, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
07.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 4e. Recitativo (Evangelista): Da das Jesus merkete
01:16
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ekkehard Abele, Jörg Dürmüller, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
08.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 5. Recitativo (Alto): Du liever Heiland du
00:47
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Bogna Bartosz, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
09.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 6. Aria (Alto): Buss und Rue
03:55
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Bogna Bartosz, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
10.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 7. Recitativo (Evangelista, Judas): Da ging hin der Zwölfen einer
00:36
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Klaus Mertens, Jörg Dürmüller, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
11.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 8. Aria (Soprano): Blute nur, du liebes Herz!
04:35
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Cornelia Samuelis, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
12.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 9a. Recitativo (Evangelista): Aber am ersten Tage der Süssen Brot
00:13
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Jörg Dürmüller, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
13.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 9b. Chorus I: Wo willst du, das wir dir bereiten
00:21
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Ton Koopman, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
14.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 9c. Recitativo (Evangelista, Jesus) Er sprach: Gehet hin in die Stadt
00:59
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ekkehard Abele, Jörg Dürmüller, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
15.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 9d. Recitativo (evangelista): Und sie wurden
00:09
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Jörg Dürmüller, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
16.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 9e. Chorus I: Herr, ben ich's?
00:11
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Ton Koopman, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
17.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 10. Choral: Ich bin's, ich sollte büssen
00:42
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Ton Koopman, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
18.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 11. Recitativo (Evangelista, Jesus): Er antwortete und sprach
02:47
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Klaus Mertens, Ekkehard Abele, Jörg Dürmüller, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
19.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 12. Recitativo (Soprano): Wiewohl mein Herz in Tränen schwimmt
01:16
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Cornelia Samuelis, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
20.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 13. Aria (Soprano): Ich will dir mein Herze schenken
03:23
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Cornelia Samuelis, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
21.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 14. Recitativo (Evangelista, Jesus): Und da sie den Lobgesang
01:00
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Ekkehard Abele, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
22.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 15. Choral: Erkenne mich, mein Hüte
00:55
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
23.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 16. Recitativo (Evangelista, Jesus, Petrus): Petrus aber antwortete
00:53
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Ekkehard Abele, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
24.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 17. Choral: Ich will hier bei dir stehen
00:54
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
25.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 18. Recitativo (Evangelista, Jesus): Da kam Jesus mit ihnen zu einem Hofe
01:39
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Ekkehard Abele, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
26.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 19. Recitativo (Tenore): O Schmerz!; Choral (Chorus II): Was ist die Ursach
01:45
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Paul Agnew, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
27.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 20. Aria (Tenore, Chorus II): Ich will bei meinem Jesu wachen
05:06
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Paul Agnew, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
28.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 21. Recitativo (Evangelista, Jesus): Und ging hin ein wenig
00:37
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Ekkehard Abele, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
29.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 22. Recitativo (Basso): Der heoland fällt vor seinem Vater nieder
00:53
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
30.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 23. Aria (Basso): Gerne will ich mich bequenem
03:55
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
31.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 24. Recitativo (Evangelista, Jesus): Und er kam zu seinem Jüngern
01:05
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Ekkehard Abele, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
32.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 25. Choral: Was mein Gott will, das g'scheh allzeit
00:47
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
33.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 26. Recitativo (Evangelista, Jesus, Judas): Und er kam und fand sie aber schlafend
02:02
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Ekkehard Abele, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
34.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 27a. Aria (Soprano, Alto - Chorus II): So ist mein Jesus nun gefangen
03:22
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Cornelia Samuelis, Bogna Bartosz, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
35.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 27b. Chori: Sind Blitze, sind Donner in Wolken verschwunden?
01:03
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
36.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 28. Recitativo (Evangelista, Jesus): Und siehe, einer aus denen4
01:55
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Ekkehard Abele, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
37.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 29. Choral: O Mensch, bewein dein Sünde gross
05:46
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
38.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 30. Aria (Alto, Chorus II): Ach! nun ist mein Jesus hin!
03:55
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Bogna Bartosz, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
39.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 31. Recitativo (Evangelista): Die aber Jesum gegriffen hatten
00:51
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
40.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 32. Choral: mir hat die Welt trüglich gericht'
00:34
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
41.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 33. Recitativo (Evangelista, Pontifex): Und wiewohl viel falsche Zeugen
01:03
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Bogna Bartosz, Paul Agnew, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
42.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 34. Recitativo (Tenore): Mein Jesus schweigt
01:01
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Paul Agnew, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
43.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 35. Aria (Tenore): Geduld!
03:18
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Paul Agnew, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra

Disc #2
01.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 36a. Recitativo (Evangelista, Pontifex, Jesus): Und der Hohepriester antwortete
01:11
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Ekkehard Abele, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
02.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 36b. Chori: Er ist des Todes schuldig!
00:10
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
03.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 36c. Recitativo (Evangelista): Da speieten sie aus in sein Angesicht
00:13
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
04.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 36d. Chori: Weissage uns, Christe
00:00
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
05.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 37. Choral: Wer hat dich so geschlagen
00:44
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
06.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 38a. Recitativo (evangelista, Ancilla I, II, Petrus): Petrus aber sass draussen im Palast
00:48
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Cornelia Samuelis, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
07.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 38b. Chorus II: Wahrlich, du bist auch einer von denen
00:11
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
08.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 38c. Recitativo (Evangelista, Petrus): Da hub er an, sich zu verfluchen
01:11
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
09.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 39. Aria (Alto): Erbarme dich
06:09
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Bogna Bartosz, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
10.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 40. Choral: Bin ich gleich von der gewichen
00:49
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
11.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 41a. Recitativo (Evangelista, Judas): Des morgens aber hielten
00:50
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
12.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 41b. Chori: Was gehet uns das an?
00:07
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
13.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 41c. Recitativo (Evangelista, Pontifex I, II): Und er warf die Silberlinge
00:39
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
14.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 42. Aria (Basso): Gebt mir meinen Jesum wieder!
02:46
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
15.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 43. Recitativo (Evangelista, Pilatus, Jesus): Sie hielten aber einen Rat
01:55
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Ekkehard Abele, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
16.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 44. Choral: Befiehl du deine Wege
00:55
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
17.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 45a. Recitativo (Evangelista, Platus, Uxor Pilati, Chorus): Auf das Fest aber
01:53
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Cornelia Samuelis, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
18.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 45b. Chori: Lass ihn kreuzigen!
00:20
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
19.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 46. Choral: Wie wunderbarlich ist doch diese Strafe!
00:43
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
20.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 47. Recitativo (Evangelista, PIlatus): Der Landphleger sagte
00:18
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
21.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 48. Recitativo (Soprano): Er hat uns allen wohlgetan
01:10
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Cornelia Samuelis, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
22.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 49. Aria (Soprano): Aus Liebe
04:58
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Cornelia Samuelis, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
23.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 50a. Recitativo (Evangelista): Sie schrieen aber noch mehr
00:05
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
24.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 50b. Chori: Lass ihn kreuzigen!
00:17
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
25.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 50c. Recitativo (Evangelista, Pilatus): Da abre Pilatus sahe
00:25
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
26.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 50d. Chori: Sein Blut komme über uns und unsere Kinder
00:35
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
27.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 50e. Recitativo (Evangela): Da gab er ihnen Barrabam los
00:27
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
28.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 51. Recitativo (Alto): Erbarm es Gott!
01:02
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Bogna Bartosz, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
29.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 52. Aria (Alto): Können Tränen meiner Wangen
05:31
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Bogna Bartosz, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
30.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 53a. Recitativo (Evangelista): Da nahmen die Kriegsknechte
00:34
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
31.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 53b. Chori: Gegrüsset seist du, Judenkönig!
00:10
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
32.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 53c. Recitativo (Evangelista): Und speieten ihn an
00:21
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
33.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 54. Choral: O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden
02:07
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
34.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 55. Recitativo (Evangelista): Und da sie ihn verspottet hatten
00:55
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
35.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 56. Recitativo (Basso): Ja freilich will in uns das Fleisch un Blut
00:36
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
36.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 57. Aria (Basso): Komm, süsses Kreuz
06:21
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
37.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 58a. Recitativo (Evangelista): Und da sie an die Stätte kamen
01:29
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
38.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 58b. Chori: Der du den Tempel Gottes zerbrichst
00:24
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
39.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 58c. Recitativo (Evangelista): Desgleichen auch die Hohenpriester
00:07
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
40.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 58d. Chori: Andern hat er geholfen
00:42
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
41.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 58e. Recitativo (Evangela): Und da sie an die Stätte kamen
00:14
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
42.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 59. Recitativo (Alto): Ach Golgatha!
01:23
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Bogna Bartosz, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
43.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 60. Aria (Alto, Chorus II): Sehet, Jesus Hat die Hand
03:23
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Bogna Bartosz, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
44.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 61a. Recitativo (Evangelista, Jesus): Und von der sechsten Stunde an
01:20
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Ekkehard Abele, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
45.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 61b. Chorus I: Der rufet dem Elias!
00:04
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
46.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 61c. Recitativo (Evangelista): Und bald lief einer unter ihnen
00:13
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
47.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 61d. Chorus II: Halt! lass sehen, on Elias komme und ihm helfe?
00:07
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
48.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 61e. Recitativo (Evangelista): Und bald lief einer unter ihnen
00:30
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Ekkehard Abele, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
49.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 62. Choral: Wenn ich einmal soll scheiden
01:09
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
50.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 63a. Recitativo (Evangelista): Und siehe da, der Vorhang
01:00
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
51.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 63b. Chori: Wahlich, dieser ist Gottes Sohn gewesen
00:16
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
52.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 63c. Recitativo (Evangelista): und es waren viel Weiber da
01:00
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
53.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 64. Recitativo (Basso): Am Abend, da es kühle was
01:50
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
54.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 65. Aria (Basso): Mache dich, mein Herze, rein
06:02
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
55.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 66a. Recitativo (Evangelista): Und Joseph nahm den Leib
00:49
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
56.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 66b. Chori: herr, wir haben gedacht
00:46
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
57.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 66c. Recitativo (Evangelista, Pilatus): Pilatus sprach zu ihnen
00:35
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Jörg Dürmüller, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
58.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 67. Recitativo (Basso, Tenore, Alto, Soprano - Chorus II): Nun ist der Herr zur Ruh gebracht
02:02
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Ton Koopman, Paul Agnew, Klaus Mertens, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
59.
Matthäus Passion BWV 244: 68. Chori: Wir setzen uns mit Tränen nieder
05:18
(Johann Sebastian Bach ) Boys Choir of Sacraments-Church Breda, Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Choir, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
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