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Sonatas For Clarinet and Piano

Lars Wouters van den Oudenweijer / Hans Eijsackers

Sonatas For Clarinet and Piano

Price: € 12.95
Format: CD
Label: Challenge Classics
UPC: 0608917219920
Catnr: CC 72199
Release date: 27 March 2009
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Label
Challenge Classics
UPC
0608917219920
Catalogue number
CC 72199
Release date
27 March 2009
Album
Artist(s)
Composer(s)
EN
NL
DE

About the album

On this album clarinettist Lars Wouters van den Oudenweijer and pianist Hans Eijsackers perform three sonatas by Max Reger (1873-1916).

The true musician is like an archaeologist: In his search for hidden beauty he must often dig through a deep layer of sand. It is a metaphor that certainly applies to Lars Wouters van den Oudenweijer. This young Dutch clarinettist doesn’t believe in playing a wide, accessible repertoire. Pure curiosity consistently drives him to obscure, little played works by composers whose lot was to remain overshadowed by celebrated contemporaries. His incessant quest for ‘the other nuance’, as well as an urge to convey ‘difficult’ music to audiences, led him to Max Reger, who was surrounded by a firmament of illustrious and revered colleagues such as Johannes Brahms, Gustav Mahler and Richard Strauss. “I feel that Reger’s music deserves more attention,” says Wouters about the recordings that he and his regular pianist Hans Eijsackers have issued of the composer’s three sonatas for clarinet and piano. “These sonatas are seldom played, which is a real shame!”

The fact that these clarinet sonatas – op. 49 nos. 1 and 2 and op. 107 – have remained so little known has nothing to do with the quality of the works, according to Wouters. It is rather the thick layer of sand which, as a ‘musician-archaeologist’, you have to burrow through before emerging into the personal, isolated world of Max Reger. “Even in the deeper layers you don’t happen right away on a beautiful melody that simply speaks for itself,” explains the clarinettist.

Is that why the works are played so seldom?
“I don’t think so. Beauty is relative. I like the melancholy shades of the sonatas, the deep autumn colours, that solemn dark brown, the sun suddenly breaking through the clouds. No, I rather think that many clarinettists avoid them because they are so difficult. To start with, Reger composed very long lines without giving much consideration to the fact that you have to breathe occasionally. Not only that, he often modulates after every bar, meaning you find yourself in keys that are very awkward on the clarinet.”

So Reger made no allowances for the nature of the instrument?
“No. He had heard the clarinet sonatas that Brahms wrote in 1894 for Richard Mühlfeld, a clarinettist he greatly admired. He was so taken with them that he decided to follow suit. The first two he wrote very quickly, in 1900, assigning them a single opus number. The third, which is much more melodious and accessible, came about eight or nine years later. He wanted to let the clarinet sing, which led him to write fiendishly difficult passages. Difficult, but not impossible. Though I wouldn’t be surprised to hear that other clarinettists have occasionally decided to give them a miss.”

Why didn’t you think that?
“Because the music is close to my heart. I hear a man who loved his music.”

How would you describe Reger as a human being?
“Headstrong, passionate and not easy to get on with. Eccentric and therefore isolated. He was a man who battled against small-minded values. Well known is the fact that he drank a lot and often composed in a café. A notoriously awkward customer, he would order five beers after the publican had called out ‘last orders’, and then kick up a fuss if he didn’t get them.

Is it important for a musician to have this sort of psychological and musicological knowledge about a composer in order to be able to interpret his music properly?
“Obviously you can’t ignore the man himself or the time in which he lived. More important, however, is, I think, your own intuition. The kind of playing this music calls for is something you have to feel for yourself. The question, ‘What do I feel in response to the music?’ is at least as important. If you only look at the musicological aspects, the risk is that your interpretation will sound really distant. You have to give the music something personal.”

You did that and then you went into the studio…
“…which is a totally different playing field. There you have that microphone, and you know it hears every single thing. You’re faced with the knowledge that you have to record seventy minutes of difficult music in two days. The acoustic is not natural. That’s your next struggle: all those artificial constraints and obstacles you have to overcome. And all the time you have to be occupied with the music.”

But don’t concerts have external factors that distract from what it’s really about, i.e. the music?
“Of course, but much less so than in the studio. During concerts you have the composer-performer-audience triangle. And the tension this creates – that’s what makes the music, that’s what makes it human. In front of a hall full of people it’s easier to go in search of the space the composer has given you to communicate his music to them. The fact is that good composers always create this space. Obviously you do the same thing in the studio, but there it’s more difficult simply because there are no people in it. That’s why, like in this case with Reger, it gives that extra satisfaction when it works.”

You’ve now been, as it were, intensively involved with Max Reger for some time. Do you think he was a nice man?
“Yes! I think I would have liked him a lot. I’m fond of people who remain true to themselves and believe strongly in what they do, and therefore don’t follow the welltrodden path.”

People like Lars Wouters van den Oudenweijer?
“You could say that, yes. There’s a good reason why I chose Reger’s music...”


Ruud Meijer
Translation: Ian Gaukroger
Op zoek naar de onbekende werken van Max Reger
De ware musicus is een archeoloog: in zijn zoektocht naar schoonheid moet hij vaak door een diepe laag zand graven. Deze metafoor is helemaal van toepassing op Lars Wouters van den Oudenwijer. Deze jonge klarinettist speelt geen bekend repertoire: liever duikt hij in de vergeten of verborgen parels van de muziekgeschiedenis. Deze zoektocht naar onbekende werken, samen met zijn drang om “moeilijke” muziek aan een breder publiek te presenteren, brachten hem naar de werken van Max Reger. Reger was een componist in de tijd van Johannes Brahms, Gustav Mahler en Richard Strauss. Volgens Wouters heeft de relatieve onbekendheid van de composities van Reger niets te maken met de kwaliteit van de stukken, maar zijn deze subtiele sonates enkel bedolven onder de grote namen van de 19e eeuw.

Lars Wouters van Oudenwijer maakte in 1999 zijn debuut bij het Concertgebouworkest na een studie aan de Juilliard School for Music in New York. In 2003 won hij een Edison voor zijn debuut cd en sinds 2007 is hij de artistiek leider van het Toon Festival Brabant. Hij speelt de sonates op dit album samen met pianist Hans Eijsackers, met wie hij vaker samenwerkt. Eijsackers is een Nederlandse pianist die op zijn 13e al zijn eerste pianocompetitie won. Hij heeft in meerdere tournees gespeeld in Europa, Azië en Amerika en heeft internationale allure als solopianist − in kamermuziek en als begeleider voor liederen.
Der EDISON-Gewinner Lars Wouters van den Oudenweijer ist seit 2000 Mitglied der Spectrum Concerts Berlin. Er musizierte u.a. mit Charles Neidich, Emmanuel Pahud, Julian Rachlin, Alexei Lubimov, Janine Jansen und mit Ensembles wie Quartetto Ebüne und Altenberg Trio. Gemeinsam mit seinem Klavierpartner Hans Eijsackers widmet er sich mit Hingabe und Leidenschaft den melancholisch verschatteten Klarinettensonaten von Reger, die immer noch sehr selten gespielt werden.

Artist(s)

Lars Wouters van den Oudenweijer (clarinet)

Dutch clarinetist Lars Wouters van den Oudenweijer (1977) studied at the Juilliard School for Music in New York with clarinetist Charles Neidich on a sponsorship by the Fulbright International Scholarship Program. Lars has won several first prizes at international competitions such as the 'International Competition for Youth' (Lisbon 1994) and the “RTBF Jeunes Solistes” (Brussels 1993). In 1999 he made his début in the Amsterdam Concertgebouw and performed very successfully as a Rising Star in the so named concert series in 2001-2002. Since then, Lars has played in major venues such as Carnegie Hall New York, Wigmore Hall London, Musik Verein Vienna, Cité de la Musique Paris and Philharmonie Berlin. He has appeared as a soloist with orchestras such as...
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Dutch clarinetist Lars Wouters van den Oudenweijer (1977) studied at the Juilliard School for Music in New York with clarinetist Charles Neidich on a sponsorship by the Fulbright International Scholarship Program. Lars has won several first prizes at international competitions such as the "International Competition for Youth" (Lisbon 1994) and the “RTBF Jeunes Solistes” (Brussels 1993). In 1999 he made his début in the Amsterdam Concertgebouw and performed very successfully as a Rising Star in the so named concert series in 2001-2002. Since then, Lars has played in major venues such as Carnegie Hall New York, Wigmore Hall London, Musik Verein Vienna, Cité de la Musique Paris and Philharmonie Berlin. He has appeared as a soloist with orchestras such as the Rotterdam Philharmonic, Chamber Orchestra of the Netherlands, New Ensemble Amsterdam and Amsterdam Sinfonietta. He performed the world premiere of the Clarinet Concerto "Yellow Darkness", written for him by Willem Jeths, in 2005 and the piece "Euro" by Theo Abazis at Carnegie Hall in 2001.
Lars has been a member of Spectrum Concerts Berlin since 2000. He has performed with string quartets and ensembles such as Skampa Quartet, Quatuor Danel, Quatuor Ebène, and Altenberg Trio Wien. Lars performs frequently in the major international festivals with colleagues like Janine Jansen, Inon Barnatan, Amihai Grosz etc. He is also a guest-player with the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields in the UK. In 2003, Lars was awarded an "Edison" for his début CD. Other CD’s followed, with music by Dohnányi, Harbison and Hindemith. In 2009, Challenge Records released his CD with Reger sonatas, which received outstanding reviews by the international music press. Lars founded and is artistic director of the "Dutch Tone Festival" in ‘s-Hertogenbosch. He teaches at the Fontys Music Academy Tilburg.

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Hans Eijsackers (piano)

Hans Eijsackers was born in The Hague. When he was 13 years old he won the first Rotterdam Piano-Driedaagse and Princess Christina Competition. He was winner of the European Piano Competition in 1991 in Luxembourg, playing Rachmaninow’s Concerto nr.2 with the R.T.L. Symphony Orchestra conducted by Jacques Mercier. He also won the Special Prize for the best song accompaniment. Among his professors were: Koos Bons, Gerard van Blerk, Jan Wijn and György Sebök. In 1992 he graduated at the Sweelinck Conservatory of Music in Amsterdam. In 1994 he was invited to study at the Mozart Academy in Krakow. As a result he did recitals in Poland, Budapest, Cornwall, Asia and New York. Next to his work as a professor at...
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Hans Eijsackers was born in The Hague. When he was 13 years old he won the first Rotterdam Piano-Driedaagse and Princess Christina Competition. He was winner of the European Piano Competition in 1991 in Luxembourg, playing Rachmaninow’s Concerto nr.2 with the R.T.L. Symphony Orchestra conducted by Jacques Mercier. He also won the Special Prize for the best song accompaniment. Among his professors were: Koos Bons, Gerard van Blerk, Jan Wijn and György Sebök. In 1992 he graduated at the Sweelinck Conservatory of Music in Amsterdam. In 1994 he was invited to study at the Mozart Academy in Krakow. As a result he did recitals in Poland, Budapest, Cornwall, Asia and New York. Next to his work as a professor at the conservatories of Tilburg and The Hague he performs as soloist, chamber musician and song accompanist.

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Composer(s)

Max Reger

Johann Baptist Joseph Maximilian Reger (19 March 1873 – 11 May 1916) was a German composer, conductor, pianist, organist, and academic teacher. Born in Brand, Bavaria, Reger studied music in Munich and Wiesbaden with Hugo Riemann. From September 1901 he settled in Munich, where he obtained concert offers and where his rapid rise to fame began. During his first Munich season, Reger appeared in ten concerts as an organist, chamber pianist and accompanist. He continued to compose without interruption. From 1907 he worked in Leipzig, where he was music director of the universityuntil 1908 and professor of composition at the conservatory until his death. In 1911 he moved to Meiningen where he got the position of Hofkapellmeister at the court of Georg II, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen. In 1915 he moved to Jena, commuting once a week to teach in Leipzig. He died in May 1916 on...
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Johann Baptist Joseph Maximilian Reger (19 March 1873 – 11 May 1916) was a German composer, conductor, pianist, organist, and academic teacher. Born in Brand, Bavaria, Reger studied music in Munich and Wiesbaden with Hugo Riemann. From September 1901 he settled in Munich, where he obtained concert offers and where his rapid rise to fame began. During his first Munich season, Reger appeared in ten concerts as an organist, chamber pianist and accompanist. He continued to compose without interruption. From 1907 he worked in Leipzig, where he was music director of the universityuntil 1908 and professor of composition at the conservatory until his death. In 1911 he moved to Meiningen where he got the position of Hofkapellmeister at the court of Georg II, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen. In 1915 he moved to Jena, commuting once a week to teach in Leipzig. He died in May 1916 on one of these trips of a heart attack at age 43.
He had also been active internationally as a conductor and pianist. Among his students were Joseph Haas, Sándor Jemnitz, Jaroslav Kvapil, Ruben Liljefors, George Szell and Cristòfor Taltabull.
Reger was the cousin of Hans von Koessler.

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