×

10% discount on your next order!

Subscribe to our newsletter and receive a personal discount code for 10% discount on a album of your choice! After subscribing, you will receive the code in your email. This code is only valid for 10 days!




The code is valid one time and valid for a 10 days after receiving the promotioncode. Your emailaddress will only be used by Challenge Records International and will not be given to 3rd party advertisers. If you have any questions please contact us.
Cover

Aaron Diehl

Space Time Continuum

  • Type CD
  • Label Mack Avenue
  • UPC 0673203109421
  • Catalog number MAC 1094
  • Release date 05 June 2015
Physical (CD)

Free shipping in the EU, outside the EU from €5,-

€ 19.95
Add to cart
Product is on stock
Digital

Get the album digitally

High resolution download Spirit of Turtle iTunes

About the album

Widely lauded for his 2012 Mack Avenue debut, The Bespoke Man’s Narrative, 29-year-old pianist-composer Aaron Diehl follows solidly with the 2015 release Space,Time,Continuum. On The Bespoke Man’s Narrative, Diehl presented original music drawing on antecedent bandleader-composers like John Lewis and Duke Ellington for strategies that facilitated individualistic performances from his unit of A-list peers. On Space,Time,Continuum, Diehl assembles a pan-generational ensemble of masters. Joining his core trio of bassist David Wong and drummer Quincy Davis, in different configurations, are the iconic tenor saxophonist-composer Benny Golson and the magisterial baritone saxophonist Joe Temperley,
both 85 years young; the 39-year-old underground tenor saxophone giant Stephen Riley; and the rising star trumpeter Bruce Harris.

“It’s important to use both contemporaries and elders as sources of inspiration,” Diehl says. He is particularly pleased at “the opportunity to play and improvise with living legends” Golson and Temperley. Diehl, who chooses words as carefully as notes, sums up his intentions: “I understand the jazz language as a continuum—threading together the evolution of jazz as a continual, interrelated stream of development to create a sound that’s neither old or new, but simply a landscape where we could all communicate.” 

Add a comment


We need to make sure that you are really an human, please enter the code below.

code