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Works for viola & piano

Aida-Carmen Soanea

Works for viola & piano

Price: € 19.95
Format: CD
Label: Challenge Classics
UPC: 0608917273427
Catnr: CC 72734
Release date: 10 June 2016
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Label
Challenge Classics
UPC
0608917273427
Catalogue number
CC 72734
Release date
10 June 2016

"With nothing to compare them to, I can only say that these performances bring the music to life. Aida-Carmen Soanea’s viola is warm and smooth; Igor Kamenz’s playing suggests a musical understanding well beyond mere chops—of which he has plenty. Well-balanced, intimate recorded sound rounds out a fine disc. I look forward to further exploration of Hannenheim’s almost-lost oeuvre."

Fanfare Magazine, 01-6-2017
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About the album

Blinded by racial fanaticism, the insane musical policy of the Nazis murdered, in concentration camps, or sent into exile, not only Jewish composers. It also stopped the careers of promising artists in a way, that any memory of them was almost completely extinguished. One of such tragic cases was the destiny of composer Norbert von Hannenheim. He was born in 1898 in Hermannstadt, Transylvania (actual Sibiu, Romania).
Arnold Schönberg thought of him as “...one of the most interesting and talented pupils...his talent, his seriousness, his productivity are certainly exceptional, and I think confidently, that he will have a word to say in the development of music, and that his work will carry through...”. In 1932 Hannenheim won a Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy Prize. Hannenheim was German, but as he composed atonal music, he got under the curse of so called „degenerated music“ stream. As his complete oeuvre was practically destroyed, his life changed tragically. After suffering a schizophrenic attack he was committed to a mental institution Hannenheim survived the end of the war and died on 29 September 1945.
By pure chance some of his works have been rediscovered. The source was a festival in 2001 called „Berlin School-Arnold Schönberg’s Master students at the Prussian Academy of the Arts of Berlin“. The five works for viola known until now, represent a large part of it.
Hannenheim has a similar background of folk music as Bela Bartok. He was a master student of Arnold Schönberg and, as it is said, the only capable to contradict unrestrainedly his master. This connection between grounded musicality and authentic constructive thinking is rather uncommon. One should remember the name Hannenheim.
Werken voor viool en piano van de onbekende componist Von Hannenheim
De charismatische altvioliste Aida-Carmen Soanea en pianist Igor Kamenz spelen 7 werken van Norbert von Hannenheim, die aardse muzikaliteit en originaliteit in zijn werk weet te verenigen.
De levensgeschiedenis van Von Hannenheim (1898-1945) laat zich lezen als een boek. Als jongeman vertrok hij van Roemenië naar Duitsland. Daar wachtte hem als leerling van onder andere Arnold Schönberg, een stralende toekomst. Het liep anders. Toen zijn eerste werk werd geprezen en hij naam begon te maken als componist, maakten de historische jaren 30 een einde aan zijn carriëre. Zijn muziek werd al snel veroordeeld door het Nazi regime. Die situatie, en het bij een bombardement verliezen van de koffer met zijn belangrijkste werk, waren er mede de oorzaak van dat Hannenheim terechtkwam in een gekkenhuis. Daar overleed hij op zijn 47e.
Het werk dat bewaard is gebleven kwam pas rond de eeuwwisseling boven water, waaronder de 7 stukken van deze opname.

'Schitterende muziek, die het best is te omschrijven als buitengewoon lyrische dodecafonie, die in het zeer sterke Duo fur Geige und Bratsche ook nog even onmiskenbaar aan Bartok doet denken' Erik Voermans, Het Parool, 5 juli 2016.
Eine Biographie wie die von Norbert von Hannenheim wäre heute ein Material für einen Blockbuster: Als junger Mann kam er von Rumänien nach Deutschland, wo sich im Studium, unter anderem als Meisterschüler von Arnold Schönberg, eine strahlende Zukunft für den Komponisten abzeichnete, die ihm auch sein berühmter Lehrer voraussagte. Doch als erste Werke Erfolge feierten und er sich einen Namen zu machen begann, beendeten die historischen Geschehnisse der 1930er Jahre die aufblühende Karriere: seinen atonalen Kompositionen wurde bald der vernichtende Stempel der "entarteten Musik" aufgedrückt. Das Verdikt der Nazis bedrohte seine Existenz; weitere schwere Schläge folgten: der Koffer, der all seine Kompositionen vor der Zerstörung durch die Nazis retten sollte, wurde bei einem Bombeneinschlag vernichtet, und Hannenheim starb schließlich 1945.
Bei einer solchen Lebensgeschichte nimmt es Wunder, dass Norbert von Hannenheims Kompositionen – darunter zahlreiche Werke für Bratsche – erst über 50 Jahre nach seinem Tod wiederentdeckt wurden. Mit der Aufnahme dieser Kompositionen möchte Ihnen die charismatische Bratschistin Aida-Carmen Soanea erste Einblicke in die Werke dieses noch unbekannten Komponisten geben, in denen sich bodenständige Musikalität und große Originalität verbinden.


Artist(s)

Aida-Carmen Soanea (viola)

Aida-Carmen Soanea, an eclectic and charismatic violist, won first prize at the 2005 Bucchi Viola Competition in Rome. The accolades she earned in Moscow in 2000, when Aida won second prize at the Bashmet Viola Competition and was also awarded by the “Deutsche Stiftung Musikleben” Foundation in Hamburg, Germany had already established her as one of the most formidable talents of her generation. As a soloist, Aida-Carmen has appeared in music festivals,such as Internationale Osterfestspiele Luzern, Rheingau Musikfestival, Musikfestspiele Sanssouci, Musikfestival Mecklenburg Vorpommern and she has performed with different ensemble formations, including Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra, English Youth Orchestra, European Chamber Orchestra and Berliner Symphoniker. She shared the stage,playing concerts together with Tabea Zimmermann at the Cité de la Musique Paris,...
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Aida-Carmen Soanea, an eclectic and charismatic violist, won first prize at the 2005 Bucchi Viola Competition in Rome. The accolades she earned in Moscow in 2000, when Aida won second prize at the Bashmet Viola Competition and was also awarded by the “Deutsche Stiftung Musikleben” Foundation in Hamburg, Germany had already established her as one of the most formidable talents of her generation.
As a soloist, Aida-Carmen has appeared in music festivals,such as Internationale Osterfestspiele Luzern, Rheingau Musikfestival, Musikfestspiele Sanssouci, Musikfestival Mecklenburg Vorpommern and she has performed with different ensemble formations, including Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra, English Youth Orchestra, European Chamber Orchestra and Berliner Symphoniker. She shared the stage,playing concerts together with Tabea Zimmermann at the Cité de la Musique Paris, Renaud Capuçon at the Lucerne Spring Festival,Tanja Becker- Bender making her debut in the big hall of the Berlin Philharmony and with Tasmin Little performing Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante throughout England.
An avid chamber musician, Aida-Carmen regularly performs with pianists José Gallardo and Andrej Jussow and she performed with Natalia Gutman and Kolja Blacher, as well as Reiner Kussmaul, with whom she appeared several times at the “Berliner Festwochen“.Aida-Carmen also has been a guest of many European festivals, where she collaborated with wonderful musicians as the Vertavo Quartet, Alexander Melnikov, Jean Quilhem Queyras, Adrian Brendel and many others.
From 2007 to 2015 Aida-Carmen Soanea was a founding member of the delian:quartet. In that chamber music formation,she appeared at Schleswig- Holstein Musikfestival, the Ludwigsburger Festspiele and Schwetzinger Festspiele..etc.The quartet performed in Vienna Musikverein, the Festspielhaus Baden Baden, the Philharmonie Essen, Hessischer Rundfunk Frankfurt and many major concert venues throughout Europe and enjoyed a great success.

Born into a family of Romanian singer, Aida Carmen Soanea studied from 1995 to 1999 at the Freiburg University School of Music and at the Berliner Hochschule “Hanns Eisler“ in the class of Kim Kashkashian. She found new inspiration in Paris pursuing her soloists studies at the CNSM de Paris with Gerard Causse. She was influenced and received big musical input from artists like Juri Bashmet, but especially Claudio Abbado, whom she encountered regularly as a member of Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra,later on also as a member of the Lucerne Festival Orchestra and as substitute with the Berliner Philharmoniker.

After many years of research work appears the present solo CD by Aida Carmen Soanea with works of Norbert von Hannenheim (1898-1945), a pupil of Arnold Schönberg, who died after the end of the war in a mental institution. These pieces that were considered lost, make a great enrichment to the viola repertoire of the Second Viennese School.

Aida Carmen Soanea’s feeling and connection to Contemporary Music is very strong ,so her regular participation in the Ensemble Modern in Frankfurt is part of it. She works together with different living composers and several works were dedicated to her.


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Igor Kamenz (piano)

“Wonders take some time” was the headline of an outstanding review, Helmut Mauró wrote in the Süddeutsche Zeitung which couldn’t have better described the incredible life path of “wonder pianist” Igor Kamenz. His solo CD with 4 sonatas by Beethoven was welcomed enthusiastically by the critics. Axel Brüggemann wrote in Crescendo: “An absolute Must. If there is something like space which arises out of music then Igor Kamenz is an architect in this world.” Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung wrote: “an Atlas at the piano who takes all sounds of pains”. The pianist and conductor Igor Kamenz was born in 1968 in the Far East of Russia on the river Amur close to the Chinese border. In 1975 he gave his debut...
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“Wonders take some time” was the headline of an outstanding review, Helmut Mauró wrote in the Süddeutsche Zeitung which couldn’t have better described the incredible life path of “wonder pianist” Igor Kamenz. His solo CD with 4 sonatas by Beethoven was welcomed enthusiastically by the critics. Axel Brüggemann wrote in Crescendo: “An absolute Must. If there is something like space which arises out of music then Igor Kamenz is an architect in this world.” Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung wrote: “an Atlas at the piano who takes all sounds of pains”. The pianist and conductor Igor Kamenz was born in 1968 in the Far East of Russia on the river Amur close to the Chinese border. In 1975 he gave his debut as conductor of the Novosibirsk Philharmonia with a performance of Haydn’s 94th Symphony, “Surprise”. A series of concerts as pianist, soloist and above all as conductor followed between 1976 and 1978. Kamenz gave his first concert at the Kremlin as conductor of the Bolshoi Orchestra in October 1977. His concert with the Russian All Union Radio and Television Orchestra with works from Mozart and Johann Strauß was transmitted on 1 May 1977 over the entire Soviet television network. Kamenz has been a student of Vitaly Margulis and Sergiu Celibidache for many years. He has been awarded 18 first prizes in international piano competitions. The artist has an extensive repertoire, ranging from Bach to Cage, although he is especially fond of piano compositions by Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert, the 19th century virtuoso literature, and music from the fin de siècle as well as the late Romantic Russian period. Kamenz’ recitals and solo concerts at the Schleswig Holstein Music Festival, at the Munich Herkulessaal and at Gasteig, at the Musikhalle in Hamburg, at the Bremen Glocke, at the Liederhalle Stuttgart, at the Bonn Beethovenhalle, at the Konzerthaus Berlin, at the Kennedy Centre in Washington, at the Salle Gaveau in Paris, at the Tonhalle in Zürich, at the Alte Oper in Frankfurt, at the Birmingham Symphony Hall, at the Mozarteum Salzburg, and his Liszt recital at the Large Hall of the Moscow Conservatory were triumphal. For the past years he was almost exclusively focusing on the piano. Highlights within the past years were performances at Mostly Mozart Festival presented by the Lincoln Center in New York, at Rheingau Music Festival, with the MDR Leipzig Radio Symphony Orchestra and further more. He has opened the concert season for Portland Piano International and presented several recitals with renowned soloists such as Arabella Steinbacher and Chad Hoopes. Kamenz has recorded both for radio and television in the form of studio productions and concert recordings. Attila Csampai wrote of Kamenz’ recordings of works from Liszt, Rachmaninov and Tausig: “Kamenz’s feeling for subtle differences in timbre is phenomenal” (Scala), he continued “… works of art performed by a magician …a gladiator at the keyboard …who knows all the tricks … pianistic excellence and artistic intelligence that revitalize the tradition of the ‘old’ virtuosi in a modern and analytic way” (Musik und Theater). Harold C. Schonberg wrote: “a very beautiful record ...elegant romantic playing without romantic bombast …his technique is of top international quality” (American Record Guide). Igor Kamenz, „a giant of the keyboard” (International Piano), conquers concert halls not only with „finest nuances” and „almost incomprehensible virtuosity” (Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung). Much more, he melds these with „unbelievable beauty” and „extraterrestrial musicality” (FAZ) into a personal style that does not make virtuosity, but rather the means for seeking the message in the work at hand.

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Composer(s)

Norbert von Hannenheim

Blinded by racial fanatism, the Nazis not only murdered or sent into exile Jewish composers as part of an insane musical policy, they also stopped the careers of promising artists in a way that any memory of them was almost completely extinguished. One of such tragic case was the destiny of composer Norbert von Hannenheim. He was born in 1898 in Hermannstadt, Transylvania (now Sibiu, Romania). He showed musical talent from an early age, but it was only at the age of 24 that he began regular studies at the Leipzig Conservatory with Paul Graener, a well-known composer of his time. The first important award that he won was the George Enescu Prize in 1925, after which he continued his...
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Blinded by racial fanatism, the Nazis not only murdered or sent into exile Jewish composers as part of an insane musical policy, they also stopped the careers of promising artists in a way that any memory of them was almost completely extinguished. One of such tragic case was the destiny of composer Norbert von Hannenheim. He was born in 1898 in Hermannstadt, Transylvania (now Sibiu, Romania). He showed musical talent from an early age, but it was only at the age of 24 that he began regular studies at the Leipzig Conservatory with Paul Graener, a well-known composer of his time. The first important award that he won was the George Enescu Prize in 1925, after which he continued his studies; first in Budapest with Alexander Jemnitz and finally in the class of Arnold Schönberg at the Academy of the Arts in Berlin. Schönberg thought of him as “one of the most interesting and talented pupils... his talent, his seriousness, his productivity are certainly exceptional, and I think, confidently, that he will have a word to say in the development of music and that his work will carry through.” In 1932, Hannenheim won the Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy Prize. His second piano concerto with small orchestra was very successful and broadcasted internationally. Soon after he started to be well known abroad, the Nazis destroyed his artistic future. Hannenheim was German, but as he composed atonal music, he came under the curse of so-called “Entartete Musik” („degenerated music“). As a student he had already lived in very poor conditions, hungry for days. But now, banned from composing, his existence was practically destroyed. He survived daily life by copying and editing scores. Eventually, he was forced by these circumstances to indirectly assist Nazi ideology by making arrangements of German folk songs. By 1933, no publisher dared to print his music, which meant his complete works existed only as manuscripts. During the war, his few friends advised him to deposit a big suitcase full of compositions at the Commerzbank in Berlin. This office in the Tauentzienstrasse was bombed in November 1943. No one knows what happened to the suitcase. If it wasn’t destroyed in that bombing, it was likely stolen or disposed of with the rubble after the bombing. With his entire catalog destroyed, his life once again turned in a tragic direction. After suffering a schizophrenic attack, he was committed to the “Wittenauer Heilanstalten Berlin-Reinickendorf” mental institution on July 6, 1944. A month later, on August 30, 1944, he was deported to a euthanasia center in Obrawalde near Meseritz (today Miedzyrzecz, Poland) approximately 75 km away from Frankfurt/Oder.
Hannenheim survived the end of the war and died on September 29, 1945, in Obrawalde. The life of an atonal composer who lived in poverty only for his devotion to art, and due to the unpredictable games of life finished in insanity, almost unmistakably resembles the revival of Thomas Mann’s character Adrian Leverkühn. His biography could have caused a stir of interest in his oeuvre, but it took more than 50 years until his rediscovery. The musical world was amazed when Ludwig Holtmeier, a musicologist from the Freiburg Musikhochschule, published his article in 1998 about the „Berlin School“ of Arnold Schönberg. Did it oppose the „Viennese School“ of Arnold Schönberg, Alban Berg and Anton Weber? Who were these names which no one had so far heard about? It is generally believed that artistic value gets through in spite of unfavorable facts. But what if a bomb destroys an artist’s entire catalog which was fully recognized during his lifetime? By pure chance, some of his works have been rediscovered. The source was a festival in 2001 called „Berliner Schule – Arnold Schönbergs Meisterschüler an der Preußischen Akademie der Künste“ in Berlin, where some of Hannenheim’s works were highlighted. Of about 240 works registered at STAGMA (the precursor of GEMA) and reviewed in known articles, some 45 works (or 19%) have been rediscovered. The already known five works for viola represent a large part of it. In around 1936, Hannenheim showed his first Viola Sonata to Emil Seiler (1906-1998) by chance. He liked it so much that Hannenheim immediately wrote a second one for him, as he liked to write several pieces for the same instrument nearly simultaneously.
Schönberg did attribute him with remarkable productivity. In the estate of Emil Seiler were conserved two sonatas and a four movement suite. The „3 Bratschenstücke“, which do not have a title in the manuscript, strangely came to light in the estate of Isolde von Geyer, widow of the painter Hans von Geyer zu Lauf, where they were identified as Hannenheim’s works by Prof. Holtmeier. Two expert testimonies of the „Amt Rosenberg“ regarding the first sonata and the suite did survive. This surveillance office propagated the cultural policy of the Nazi regime. The first report dated February 3, 1936, characterizes Hannenheim as „a musician with remarkable counterpoint skills but considerable intellectualizing characteristics, who develops performing energies through an overbred harmonic. The talent is obvious.“ The „Bratschenstücke are too ramified in their lines and stay too academic to give the impression of a lively expression of true contemporary musical emotion“. At least the standard reproach of „decadent cultural bolshevism” was missing. The second report stays to the point: „it is constructive music which individualizes each tone and refuses any functional interference.“ Only themes and rhythms act as coherent powers. 1. Construction and ‘thematics’: Hannenheim did sometimes compose in a strict dodecaphonic style (12-tone), but in the viola works he developed the principle of composing with a tone row in an original way. He leads not from an „only“ dodecaphonic tone row but from a melody treated like a tone row. In the first movement of the Viola Sonata the row has 54 tones, in the first movement of the suite 30. Hannenheim replaces the „abstract row“ by a long, shaped „theme“ which, when being repeated, changes only rhythmically and stabilizes the structure of the movement like a cantus firmus. 2. Rhythm: Hannenheim loves concise, often dancing rhythms, meters who change in pairs like 2/4 3/4, 4/4 3/4, which could easily be united as 5/4 or 7/4. It is not clear if he was inspired rather by Romanian folk music or Bartok’s rhythms. In any case, his music owes its vitality mostly to its lively rhythms. 3. Harmony: Hannenheim composes tonally very unconventionally. His spectrum goes from sharp atonal dissonances and massive six-tone chords in the first Viola Sonata to C-major sound surface in the second sonata, where in all three movements his principle is to confront a C-major chord with an F sharp major chord (the augmented fourth) in order to create an opposite pole. Normally a strict dodecaphonist shies away from any chord, but Hannenheim enthusiastically takes conventional chords in the ‘heiter und ironisch’ of the ‘3 Bratschenstücke’, where he begins in E major and A major. In spite of any constructivism, he preserves his natural sense of harmony. Hannenheim has a similar background in folk music as Bela Bartok. He was a prize student of Arnold Schönberg and, it is said, the only one capable of unabashedly contradicting his master. This connection between grounded musicality and authentically constructive thinking is rather uncommon. One should remember the name Hannenheim.

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Press

With nothing to compare them to, I can only say that these performances bring the music to life. Aida-Carmen Soanea’s viola is warm and smooth; Igor Kamenz’s playing suggests a musical understanding well beyond mere chops—of which he has plenty. Well-balanced, intimate recorded sound rounds out a fine disc. I look forward to further exploration of Hannenheim’s almost-lost oeuvre.
Fanfare Magazine, 01-6-2017

The musicians on this CD feel the musical world of Von Hannenheim perfectly and render the pieces with a lot of empathy for detail.
Nieuwe Noten, 27-1-2017

Aida-Carmen Soanea and Igor Kamenz are a tried and true team that have immersed themselves in Hannenheim's unique sound world and bring it to fascinating new life.
Journal of the American Viola Society, 01-1-2017

Klassik Heute - 18/11/2016
Klassik Heute, 18-11-2016

"Aida Carmen Soanea and Igor Kamenz found here very differentiated overtones and expressive drama when the music it asks."
Fono Forum, 01-11-2016

"I suspect that Berlin mucicians from the interbellum would have played this music with much panache."
, 01-9-2016

"I suspect that Berlin mucisians from the interbellum this music played much lighter and with more panache would have played."
, 01-9-2016

So, this is a very special and attractive program with a guarantee for a rewarding listening.
Pizzicato, 03-8-2016

Interview with Aida-Carmen Soanea
WDR 3 Tonart, 20-7-2016

" [...] Everything makes a wonderful way to meet Norbert von Hannenheim [...] "
Opus Klassiek, 20-7-2016

Beautiful music, that you could could describe best as extraordinary lyrical dodecaphony, that makes you think of Bartok in the Duo fur Geige und Bratsche.
Het Parool, 05-7-2016

Play album Play album
01.
Stück Nr. 1: I. Etwas Langsam
02:07
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Igor Kamenz, Aida-Carmen Soanea
02.
Stück Nr. 1: II. Heiter, ironisch
02:56
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Igor Kamenz, Aida-Carmen Soanea
03.
Stück Nr. 3: III. Sehr lebhaft
05:12
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Aida-Carmen Soanea, Igor Kamenz
04.
Stück Nr. 4: I. Leicht bewegt
03:14
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Aida-Carmen Soanea, Igor Kamenz
05.
Stück Nr. 4: II. Lebhaft
04:19
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Aida-Carmen Soanea, Igor Kamenz
06.
Duo für Geige und Bratsche: I. Allegro
04:57
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Aida-Carmen Soanea, Adrian Pinzaru
07.
Duo für Geige und Bratsche: II. Molto largo e dolcissimo
01:48
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Aida-Carmen Soanea, Adrian Pinzaru
08.
Duo für Geige und Bratsche: III. Presto
02:53
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Aida-Carmen Soanea, Adrian Pinzaru
09.
Suite für Viola und Klavier: I. Moderato
01:44
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Aida-Carmen Soanea, Igor Kamenz
10.
Suite für Viola und Klavier: II. Animato
01:44
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Aida-Carmen Soanea, Igor Kamenz
11.
Suite für Viola und Klavier: III. Lento
03:42
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Aida-Carmen Soanea, Igor Kamenz
12.
Suite für Viola und Klavier: IV. Presto
01:41
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Aida-Carmen Soanea, Igor Kamenz
13.
Sonate Nr. 1 für Bratsche und Klavier: I. Andante con moto
03:46
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Aida-Carmen Soanea, Igor Kamenz
14.
Sonate Nr. 1 für Bratsche und Klavier: II. Presto
04:29
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Aida-Carmen Soanea, Igor Kamenz
15.
Sonate Nr. 2 für Bratsche und Klavier: I. Allegro
02:18
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Aida-Carmen Soanea, Igor Kamenz
16.
Sonate Nr. 2 für Bratsche und Klavier: II. Adagio
02:50
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Aida-Carmen Soanea, Igor Kamenz
17.
Sonate Nr. 2 für Bratsche und Klavier: III. Presto
02:00
(Norbert von Hannenheim) Aida-Carmen Soanea, Igor Kamenz
show all tracks

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